Revolution Every Day: Dziga Vertov in the 1930s

Revolution Every Day: Dziga Vertov in the 1930s

The Film Studies Center and the Smart Museum of Art will present three exciting screenings of rarely seen films by Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov. After The Symphony of the Donbass (1930), his first film shot with synchronous sound, Vertov undertook a series of films in a genre he denoted as “poetic documentary.” The three filmsThree Songs about Lenin (1934/1938), Lullaby (1937), and The Three Heroines (1938)comprise a trilogy on the situation of women in the USSR; they show Vertov wrestling with the new possibilities of sound documentary, combining carefully edited archival footage with long-take, synchronous-sound interviews, and weaving popular song into extensive authorial text. They also present a history of Vertov’s engagement with Stalinism, showing a film artist struggling to maintain faithful to his creative principles under stressful and rapidly changing conditions. Projected from archival prints and with new subtitles, these films will challenge our notions of Vertov as a filmmaker, of Soviet film under Stalin, and of the documentary mode.

Schedule of screenings:
Oct. 6, 7pm: Three Songs about Lenin
Oct. 20, 7pm: Lullaby
Nov. 10, 8pm: The Three Heroines

Co-presented by the Smart Museum of Art in conjunction with "Revolution Every Day: Dziga Vertov in the 1930s," on exhibit Sept. 14, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018.